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It only takes a minute to sign up. People frequently also use the term move action when talking about the kinds of actions you can take during your turn. On your turn, you can move a distance up to your speed and take one action. This means moving is not the same as taking an action. You may always move a distance up to your speed on your turn without taking any actions barring special conditions — but let's not get into that! Because why would there be, if you can always do this anyway?

When you take the Dash action, you gain extra movement for the current turn. The increase equals your speed, after applying any modifiers. With a speed of 30 feet, for example, you can move up to 60 feet on your turn if you dash.

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It allows you to increase your movement. You can always move, and taking the Dash action only helps you move faster. We've been talking about moving on your turn always being possible. But outside your turn, it is not so unless you take a specific action. First, you decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. Then, [ Examples include [ There is something called a reaction which is also available to you.

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For the purposes of this question, we don't need to dwell on what are the specifics of a reaction, though. You may do the Ready action to do something on someone else's turn that is normally only possible on your turn, expending your reaction. This includes moving. Note: this Ready action is not being used with a Dash action, it is being used to just move on another creature's turn.When using the attack action with a melee weaponyou can move both before and after the attack, provided that your total distance moved is not greater than your speed.

Moving in this way does not provoke an attack of opportunity from the defender you attack, though it might provoke attacks of opportunity from other creatures, if appropriate. You must move at least 5 feet both before and after you make your attack in order to utilize the benefits of Spring Attack.

A fighter may select Spring Attack as one of his fighter bonus feats. Jump to: navigationsearch. Benefit When using the attack action with a melee weaponyou can move both before and after the attack, provided that your total distance moved is not greater than your speed.

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Character Vault. Roll20 for Android. Roll20 for iPad. Community Toggle Dropdown. Searches must be at least 3 characters. Requires Attunement While you wear these boots, your walking speed becomes 30 feet, unless your walking speed is higher, and your speed isn't reduced if you are encumbered or wearing Heavy Armor. In addition, you can jump three times the normal distance, though you can't jump farther than your remaining Movement would allow.

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It only takes a minute to sign up. I have been looking at long distance travel via mounts versus travelling on foot, so that I can more effectively build and describe the world, as well as manage random encounters and such. I am having trouble figuring out a certain part of the PHB description of mounted travel:.

For short spans of time up to an hourmany animals move much faster than humanoids. A mounted character can ride at a gallop for about an hour, covering twice the usual distance for a fast pace. If fresh mounts are available every 8 to 10 milescharacters can cover larger distances at this pace, but this is very rare except in densely populated areas. A creature that serves as a flying mount must rest 1 hour for every 3 hours it flies, and it can't fly for more than 9 hours per day.

Thus, characters mounted on griffons which have a flying speed of 80 feet can travel at 8 miles per hour, covering 72 miles over 9 hours with two 1-hour-long rests over the course of the day.

So looking at either a Riding Horse or a Warhorse, each of which has a walking speed of 60 ft. However, the part mentioning acquiring fresh mounts every 8 to 10 miles confuses me, as a horse could move 16 miles per hour during a gallop.

Unless the phrase "twice the usual distance for a fast pace" does not refer to the fast pace of a horse, but of typical medium creatures like many PCs, and it doesn't say one way or the other.

So how does that work, exactly? Does a galloping horse travel at twice its own fast pace, or can it only travel at twice the fast pace of a typical medium humanoid? Furthermore, if the correct answer is the latter, since galloping would be akin to the horse's fast traveling pace, does that mean galloping effectively replaces a fast travel pace by horseback? This section starts:.

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So an unencumbered horse with a speed of 60 could theoretically travel 6 miles in an hour at a normal pace. At a fast pace a gallop8 miles per hour.

That's "twice the usual distance for a fast pace", where "usual" means a creature with a speed of This suggests that a riding horse with no rider, traveling alonecan cover 48 miles per day at a normal pace. So the rule that "a mounted character can ride at a gallop for about an hour, covering twice the usual distance for a fast pace" seems to exist to allow for mounted travelers covering short distances quickly by using the mount's speed instead of "the usual pace", for up to an hour each day.

So, according to the rules, a traveler on a horse at a normal pace 3 miles per hour will cover about 24 miles in an 8-hour day. If you make the horse gallop for an hour each day fast pace for a horse being 8 miles per hourthat range increases to 29 miles. That's within the realm of what you would expect in real life, with a fast horse on good roads in fair weather. If you're using the encumbrance rule, a Riding Horse needs to be carrying less than 80 lbs of rider and equipment to get its full speed of Loaded with between 80 and lbs it has a speed of 50, and carrying between and lbs its maximum carrying capacity it has a speed of A lb adventurer in chainmail with a dungeoneering pack, longsword, and shield weighs in at about lbs, so under this rule a horse's travel pace is usually the same as an unencumbered adventurer on foot.

Over long distances, traveling while mounted is the same speed as traveling on foot. No rule states otherwise and it is reasonably consistent with real life.

People ride horses long distance because it's easier, not because it's significantly faster. A horse with no rider is another story. This makes your question about a mount's short term fast traveling moot; the answer is the same whether you use the traveler's pace or the mounted traveler's pace. Sign up to join this community.Home Post new thread What's new Latest activity Authors. Wiki Pages Latest activity. Resources Latest reviews Search resources.

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Thread starter Chaosmancer Start date Nov 30, Chaosmancer Hero. I don't have Volo's Guide yet unfortunately, but I've seen a few things on the Tabaxi, and building the fastest landspeed character is an amusing exercise. So, here I go.

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For every Ki you expend beyond 1, increase your speed by 15 feet. It does more than that, but that is the important part for this moment So, instead of before all the doubling, 19 ki spent gives us ft Double from Tabaxi, Double from Haste 1, ft Move, Dash, Dash 5, ft in six seconds According to a calculator I found on Google, that is miles per hour.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service.

Role-playing Games Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for gamemasters and players of tabletop, paper-and-pencil role-playing games. It only takes a minute to sign up. During the latest gaming session our level 3 Rogue was Two-Weapon fighting with a Rapier in the main-hand and a scimitar in the off-hand. At the completion of our gaming session I contested the application of the Two-Weapon fighting rules as it seemed unbalanced.

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So in the case of a Rogue the Bonus Actions granted under Cunning Action allow for specific actions none of which are attack. The alternate interpretation would be the rules under Two-Weapon Fighting, perhaps it should be written.

After thorough review does it boil down to application of the rules-as-written and determining a house-rule to apply in our campaign? Various class features, spells, and other abilities let you take an additional action on your turn called a bonus action.

The Cunning Action feature, for example, allows a rogue to take a bonus action. You can take a bonus action only when a special ability, spell, or other feature of the game states that you can do something as a bonus action.

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You can take only one bonus action on your turn, so you must choose which bonus action to use when you have more than one available.

A Rogue receives cunning action at level 2, You can take a bonus action on each of your turns in combat. This action can be used only to take the Dash, Disengage, or Hide action. If either weapon has the thrown property, you can throw the weapon, instead of making a melee attack with it. Anyone wielding two light weapons can attack with one weapon and use a bonus action to make an offhand attack. The Rogue's having Cunning Action as an option does not prevent them from instead choosing other bonus actions.

Otherwise they may use any other Bonus Action which is available to them. This distinction is there because the Thief and Arcane Trickster archetypes later expand the options provided by Cunning Action.

The misconception here is that you don't have "a bonus action" just lying around that you "fill" with a Bonus Action. When something says that you can use a bonus action, that means you have that bonus action lying around. Any time a rule talks about having or using a bonus action, that is both making it available and permission to use it, not just permission to use it if you have a "blank" one lying around to "spend" on it.

The only reason bonus actions are all called "bonus actions" is so that they can be limited to one of any kind per turn. Don't think of "bonus action" as an empty slot into which a specific bonus action can be placed. Instead, think of the term "bonus action" as a type-identifier for something the rules are saying you can do.

Its only purpose is to provide a keyword that other rules can "hook" in order to control how often you can do keyworded thing in a turn. Emphasis mine.

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This doesn't grant you a bonus action, but instead grants you something to do with your bonus action, which you always have, whether you can actually use it or not. So, as long as you're wielding two light melee weapons, you can attack, and then attack again using your off-hand weapon.

You don't need any other spell or feature to grant you this ability. There has been a lot of confusion around this point. You can only take one Bonus Action per turn.Free Resources on Roll All rights reserved.

5e sprinting

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5e sprinting

Roll20 for iPad. Community Toggle Dropdown. Searches must be at least 3 characters. Swimming across a rushing river, sneaking down a dungeon corridor, scaling a treacherous Mountain slope—all sorts of movement play a key role in fantasy gaming Adventures.

Speed Every character and monster has a speed, which is the distance in feet that the character or monster can walk in 1 round. This number assumes short bursts of energetic movement in the midst of a life- threatening situation. The following rules determine how far a character or monster can move in a minute, an hour, or a day. Travel Pace While traveling, a group of adventurers can move at a normal, fast, or slow pace, as shown on the Travel Pace table.


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